Garden Bloggers' Blooms Day: Coronilla

The Coronilla I first saw at West Green House

I first came across this plant a few years ago at West Green House (pictured), where it provided useful winter colour and scent in a shady part of the garden. I decided there and then it was just what was needed to provide some winter interest for our views from the kitchen.

I finally achieved that intent last year when I bought three of these plants, which go by the catchy title (not) of Coronilla valentina subsp. glauca 'Citrina' aka Scorpion vetch or Bastard senna.

My research showed it likes sunny, walled areas as well as the shade I'd seen it in, which is just as well as that's exactly the spot I had for it. However, all is not well in my garden so far. I needed two plants, one for the top terrace bed and one for a pot next to the kitchen door, but I found it was cheaper to buy three. However my Coronilla curled up its toes at my chosen spots, and prefered my careless 'bunging' of the spare plant into another patio pot, one which can't be seen from the kitchen. There it is flowering away merrily for Blooms Day. Plants can be so fickle!

Coronilla valentina subsp. glauca 'Citrina'

Now I have to decide whether to leave it in peace where it is, or to move it my preferred spot in the top terrace bed. My concern is that the pot - whilst relatively large - may be too small for what should grow into a small shrub of nearly three feet wide and tall. It's happy for now, but the pot also has tulips and a remnant of a Buddleja, so I suspect it won't like it there for much longer.

I also have the option of placing it in the new border I'm making at the bottom of the garden. This was going to be a woodland garden, but a month ago the neighbours behind us removed the trees that made it that way, so I now have some sunny spots down there too. My concern is the soil may not be well drained enough. Decisions... decisions...

I'll let you know how I get on!

Garden Bloggers' Blooms Day is hosted by Carol at May Dreams Gardens.

The flower heads are arranged in a distinct circle


Update: Here's a photo I took today shot from overhead so you can see why it got its name Coronilla, which in botany means any plant which carries its flowers arranged like a coronet. It's also the Spanish word for crown.

Comments

  1. I was not familiar with coronilla. No wonder it looks like a pea! Such a suitable name for these days. The online information isn't terribly helpful, saying it can be an annual or a perennial, deciduous or evergreen! It's very pretty though.

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    1. I wonder if the annual/evergreen dilemma depends on what Zone you're in Lisa? I seem to remember some plants I've seen on Fling visits being grown as perennials while they're definitely an annual here in the UK.

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  2. Coronilla? That's a new plant for me. Pretty little thing...

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  3. That seem to be pretty little plant must say quite resemblance to sweet peas .Happy blooms day.

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    1. Those leaves are the giveaway Arun, most definitely a member of the pea family :)

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  4. That looks attractive VP and scented to boot. I'm not a great fan of yellow flowers but ......
    Most inconsiderate of the neighbours to remove those trees and thwart your plans.

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    Replies
    1. I think the trees will grow back in time as the neighbour has replaced the Leylandii hedge... with another Leylandii hedge. Such a lost opportunity :(

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  5. I needed to look this one up to learn more. It seems to be hardy to my climate, but no colder.
    -Ray

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    Replies
    1. It's a cracking plant for winter interest - good luck with your research :)

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  6. Happy belated GBBD! In Sweden where I grew up, we had a version of that we called 'Käringtand' meaning 'Old Woman's Tooth'. Wonder why such a lovely flower inspires such ghastly names...?

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    1. It's funny you should say that Anna, but when I added the more recent photo to the end of the post, I thought I could see teeth!

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  7. Missing your woodland trees? Sounds sad.

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    1. Not really Diana as they were Leylandii, which have very little ornamental or wildlife value, but we now have a replacement Leylandii hedge which he's promised will be looked after better and not get out of hand like the previous neighbours did. Time will tell...

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  8. That is a really pretty plant - I love the way plants decide for themselves where they want to be :)
    xxx

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    1. Yes, they have minds of their own Karen!

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  9. A strange looking plant. I don't fancy its chances sharing a pot with a buddleia - but maybe it too is a bit of a thug and they can fight it out. (I like buddleia too.)

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    1. It's one of the new shorter ones Lucy, but yes the buddleia should still crowd out the pot!

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