Seen at The Festival of the Tree

...if you would be happy all your life, plant a garden ~ Chinese proverb

Sunday, 1 May 2011

GBMD: The Columbine

Early evening on the allotment with my Columbine
Still, still my eye will gaze long fixed on thee,
Till I forget that I am called a man,
And at thy side fast-rooted seem to be,
And the breeze comes my cheek with thine to fan.
Upon this craggy hill our life shall pass,
A life of summer days and summer joys,
Nodding our honey-bells mid pliant grass
In which the bee half hid his time employs;
And here we'll drink with thirsty pores the rain,
And turn dew-sprinkled to the rising sun,
And look when in the flaming west again
His orb across the heaven its path has run;
Here left in darkness on the rocky steep,
My weary eyes shall close like folding flowers in sleep.

Jones Very (1813-1880)

Until recently these honey-bells were 'mid pliant grass' until I freed them to stand tall with my raspberry canes up at the allotment. I've no idea where they came from: they appeared the first year I had my plot, so I don't know whether they are the result of a deliberate act by one of my predecessors or if they self-seeded themselves from elsewhere. I love this white one above all the others which appear at this time of the year.

One year I'll remember to collect some seeds and add them to the Aquilegias I have in my garden. Or would that detract from the special feeling I have for them when I see them up at the plot?

Garden Bloggers' Muse Day is hosted by Carolyn Choi at Sweet Home and Garden Chicago.

8 comments:

  1. whatever the source, they look truly beautiful!
    do you know, that columbine blooms 1 month later here?

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  2. lovely words as well as blooms.

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  3. Fab plants!
    Used to dismiss and hoik out and now I let seed and they are everywhere. Lovely!
    Beautiful white form you have.
    Best
    R

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  4. Most especially beautiful...truly a fine form and how uplifting it would be to share the early evening on your allotment with such a specimen ...almost a wedding gown affect!

    Poetry, lovely.

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  5. Pretty, what a lovely thing to have at your plot. I would definitely collect some seed, not just because I am sure it would delight you just as much in your garden, but to see what it and the others you have would combine to create. Though I have just spotted a fluffy pale pink one with chartreuse leaves, fortunately growing out the front where I rarely see it, proving that not all offspring are attractive... It would not get to survive in the back garden...

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  6. Noooooooo!
    Columbine has become a nightmare to us on the allotments. Many of the old folk on the plots have tried everything but napalm to eradicate it (and would probably give it a go if they could get hold of some).

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  7. One of my favourite flowers although they do seed about a bit too much sometimes but only have self to blame. I enjoyed the poem.

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  8. Hi everyone - glad most of you like my Columbine :)

    Chris - sounds like your plots are good for aquilegias. Mine has never strayed away from my plot in 7 years.

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