Seen at the Festival of the Tree

...if you would be happy all your life, plant a garden ~ Chinese proverb

Monday, 15 February 2016

GBBD: The Difference Between North and South

North facing garden crocuses with closed blooms because they're in shade

Things are returning to normal at VP Gardens this month, where most of the blooms are flowering at their allotted time. I'm relieved most of the summer flowers I found in January have started their winter slumbers.

Crocuses are making a fine show for February and I have several spots where the same [unknown] variety are clumping up nicely. A walk around the garden revealed they're a good sunshine indicator; the above photo was taken in the front garden, which faces north.

South facing garden crocuses fully open in the sunshine

What a difference position can make! This photo was taken a few minutes later, in my south facing back garden. Here the crocuses were thoroughly enjoying the sunshine in readiness for any foraging bee who just happens to pass by.

Are there any good sunshine indicators in your garden?

Garden Bloggers Blooms Day is hosted by Carol at May Dreams Gardens.

17 comments:

  1. In my Garden Bloggers Blooms Day post, I mentioned this aspect of Crocus tommasinianus too: When in full sun, they open them to look like stars, whereas other species (like Crocus vernus, another early species) even on the brightest spots retains its funnel-shaped aspect.

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    1. That's interesting Anne. I don't think my crocuses are Tommies as they were in a cheap bulb collection. Your information re this observation doesn't happen across the whole crocus genus is fascinating.

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    2. At least your crocusses do have the white stems that C. tommasinianus has. I don't know how it's in the States, but over here in Europe, this species is among the cheapests of the botanicals. And there are many cheap cultivars of this species too.

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    3. The bulb company has a couple of Tommy cultivars on their list, and they're the cheapest, so it's probably one of those they put in their bulk offer. BTW I'm in England :)

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  2. Beautiful!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

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  3. Lovely pictures. Sadly my crocuses haven't fared well in the heavy rain and high winds. Flighty xx

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    1. I have other crocuses which haven't fared well Flighty, but these seem to take everything thrown at them!

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  4. Wow, are these the crocus whose stamens are used in dishes?

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    Replies
    1. No, those are autumn flowering crocus. They have distinct long orange strands, which are the stamens used for cooking.

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  5. The hellebores that enjoy the most amount of sunshine always flower first in our garden. They are all in the same bed but some are in places where there are often just patches of sunshine.

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    1. You've reminded me that it's the same in my garden Sue. The top patio 'Anna's Red' always flowers before the shaded hellebores at the bottom of the garden.

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  6. Beautiful blooms, VP! I do love the purples of crocuses. Another divide between North and South is location up and down the UK, as a rule I do believe we are three weeks behind you. So, my main crocus blooms have much growing to do. A few paler ones are considering opening in my front garden which is my indicator as its the only place to get full sun.

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    1. That's interesting to know Shirley. I was looking at a new gardening app earlier this week which delivers optional gardening task emails and reminded them that conditions between north and south can vary greatly.

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  7. Another plant (along with snowdrops) that won't grow in my garden. Like snowdrops, they come up tiny and misshapen. Daffodils though - they are very happy and grow healthy year after year. Hurray! (Glad something does!) Oh and primroses, they like it here too. Don't know why snowdrops and crocuses don't - but there we are! (I'm wondering now if it's salt in the air.)

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    Replies
    1. Hmm, I'll have to have a think about that Esther. Might be soil type rather than salt...

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  8. I have too many crocuses planted in not enough sun. But aren't they wonderful flowers. I definitely need more...

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